Sri Poyyatha Vinayagar Moorthi Temple – Oldest in Melaka

There are many history-based tourist attractions in Melaka. Relics such as temples, bridges, ancient buildings, forts, places of worship and others in full can be found in Melaka. These sites stretch of the city’s history that so many ancient relics are lucky to be maintained until now. Poyyatha Sri Vinayagar Moorthi Temple is a testament to the legacy of old centuries. Visiting this temple is one of the best things to do in Melaka as well.

Sri Poyyatha Vinayagar Moorthi Temple 

The temple is located at Harmony Street, precisely on Jalan Goldsmith adjacent to other historical buildings. This temple is the oldest Hindu temple in Malaysia, lying alone in Jalan Harmoni not without cause. It creates harmony among fellow citizens and religious followers in this region that despite different rarely dissents or dispute because of the feeling united and competitiveness appreciated among others.

Sri Poyyatha Vinayagar Moorthi Temple Melaka was built precisely in 1781 on land given by Kapitan Thaivanayagam Chitty. Construction of the Temple of Sri Poyyatha is to be dedicated to Lord Vinayagar, also known as Ganesha. Ganesha is the elephant-headed god with the body of a man and his four.  This god is renowned for his extraordinary wisdom. Ganesha is also known as the god who can grant any wish asked by people who request them.  People come to ask cure and heal of their ailment. They ask for prosperity and success, happily married lives and children.

The architecture and the aura of the temple offer few of the mesmerizing sights in Melaka. You will be able to see adornments and décor associated with the Hindu teachings. At the back of the altar you will see a statue of the authoritative god, Ganesh. The side altar is dedicated to the father and the mother of Vinayagar, and his younger brother the Lord Muruga. You are allowed to trace the trail for the sake of existing buildings here, along with all its contents that are still preserved despite being centuries old.

Many religious festivals are usually held here as the Datuk Chachar Festival and also Masi Magam. If you happen to visit here coincided with the celebration of the festival then of course will come to feel the happiness and festivities. The temple building is heavily influenced by the architectural of the Netherlands as seen from the entrance, walls, dome and roof of the temple.

The temple still maintains the bond between Hindus in Melaka. Not only the people close around the temple visit it regularly, those who live far away from the temple also try to take the time to visit. If you are searching for things to do in Melaka, then visiting Sri Poyyatha Vinayagar Moorthi Temple is highly recommended.

It is one of the recommended places to visit in Melaka for the followers of Hindu religion also for the tourists to explore more of this oldest temple in Melaka. If you have visited the temple, feel free to share your insights by adding comments below.

Address: Jalan Tokong, 75200 Melaka, Malaysia
Opened: 1781
Primary deity: Ganesha

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Putrajaya Flower and Garden Festival (FLORIA)

Putrajaya Flower and Garden Festival (FLORIA)

FLORIA Putrajaya is an annual floral event where a wide variety of flower species from different regions displayed within beautiful gardens. Some of the countries taking part include Brunei, China, Denmark, Italy, Kenya, Korea, Netherlands, Philiphines, USA, Russia, Kenya, Singapore, Spain, Taiwan, South Africa, Thailand and Vietnam.

 

30th May – 7th June 2015

Venue: Tapak Floria, Presint 4, Putrajaya

Organizer: Putrajaya Floria Sdn. Bhd Perbadanan Putrajaya

Phone: 03-8000 8000

Email: [email protected]

www.floriaputrajaya.com.my

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Straits of Malacca – The longest Strait in the world

Straits of Malacca is a funnel-shaped narrow waterway of 800 km long that connects the South China Sea and Andaman Sea. The Strait of Malacca is running between Peninsular Malaysia, southern Thailand and Sumatra (Indonesia). The name of the strait came from Malacca Sultanate that ruled the group of islands between 1400 and 1511. The port of Malacca played an important role in trade during 16th and 17th centuries.

The depth of water in the southern side of the street does not exceed 120 feet. Usually, the depth of water is around 90 feet. However, the depth of the water deepens gradually towards the northwestern side and reaches the depth of about 650 feet because the strait join with Andaman Basin.

History of Straits of Malacca

Malacca was an important city situated along the Strait of Malacca during past centuries. Malacca was the major trading port, where sailing vessels loaded with spices from all parts of the world used to come to the harbor. The port was also popular for trading various things such as silk, porcelain, textiles, camphor, sandalwood, mace, cloves, nutmeg, pepper, tin, and gold from various parts of the world. Malacca used to be the safe place as the wind was blowing always towards the right position, so that the sailors can reach the shore safely.

During the 7th century, the Srivijaya Empire based in Sumatra came into power and the empire expanded its power to Java and Malay Peninsula. The Srivijaya Empire gained control in the Strait of Malacca, Sunda Strait and Southeast Asia. The Srivijaya Empire gained military and economic domination along the Strait of Malacca for around 700 years.


Srivijaya enjoyed great benefits through spice trade between Indian, Arab and Chinese merchants. Straits of Malacca helped to establish a sea route for trade between China and India. It continued in later centuries also even after the Malacca Sultanate came into power during the 15th century.

Malacca had faced several conquerors such as English, Dutch, Portuguese, and Chinese during the past centuries. The city of Malacca became prominent for everyone who wanted to rule the Straits of Malacca as the Strait was an important route for spice trading. Hence, Malacca faced so many conquerors from 1400, so that they can reap economic benefits through spice trading.

In the year 1511, Portuguese under the leadership of Alfonso de Albuquerque conquered Malacca. However, the Portuguese could not retain the prosperity of Malacca because of the wars, competition and restrictive policies. They ruled Malacca till the year 1641 because the Dutch East India Company conquered the fort “A Famosa” built by the Portuguese during their reign.

After conquering Malacca, the Dutch rebuilt the fort and also built new buildings. Even though the Dutch constructed new buildings, the trade in Malacca declined during their regime. The Dutch conquered Malacca to eliminate the competitors and ensure safe trade in the spice-route. When the Netherlands was conquered by French in 1795, Malacca was given to the British in order to elude French from conquering the city.

In 1808, the British returned Malacca to Dutch, but the city was soon handed over to the British East India Company again. English East India Company ruled the city since 1826. In 1957, anti-colonial protest culminated and independence was proclaimed by the first Prime Minister of Malaysia, His Highness Tunku Abdul Rahman Putra Al-Haj.


Importance of Straits of Malacca

Strait of Malacca is one of the important shipping channels of the world even now. Strait of Malacca became the shortest sea channel between Persian Gulf traders and Asian traders. Oil containers from the Middle East is transported to the Pacific Rim, South Korea, Japan, and China through the Strait of Malacca. It is the main oil transport checkpoint in Asia as 35% of the all oil containers are passing through the Strait of Malacca. Approximately around 15.2 million barrels of oil are transported through this waterway. Around 90% of the oil transportation consists of crude oil transportation and rest constitutes petroleum products. Every year, more than 60,000 ships pass through the Strait of Malacca.

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